30 August 2011

Apsara Interview + Gotan Giveaway

Just a quick note: The great global blog Apsara has just posted an interview with yours truly about SoundRoots and Spin The Globe. As a warm SoundRoots welcome to visiting Apsara readers, what say we have a little contest?

I've got a copy of Gotan Project's Tango 3.0 that I'll send to a randomly selected reader within North America. If you live elsewhere, I'd still love to hear from you but you're out of range for this contest.

To enter, just send an email to SoundRootsBlog at gmail dot com -- with the subject "contest" (without the quotes, of course). Enter before midnight September 6, one week from now. The SoundRoots Randomizer will select the winner, and glory and music shall be hers/his.

Also, I'd love to know your thoughts on the interview, or your definition of "world music." Comment zone below.

6 comments:

Andy D. (SF Bay Area) said...

Wow... what is world music. I know it when I hear it. Some local cultural link is needed. Some unique sound originating from a foreign source. Does it need to come from outside the U.S.? No, but the roots and the spirit of the music would.
I look forward to hearing the new Gotan Project. My e-mail entry will be forth coming along with a donation to keep this valuable resource going.

LeRoc said...

Great interview. So SoundRoots started from 2005? I guess I've been following it almost from the beginning then. Keep up the good work!

S A Stevens said...

Yes, LeRoc, you're a familiar commenter from way back...

So do you (or others) have a definition of "world music"? And how has your understanding of this changed over time? I'd love to know.

LeRoc said...

Hm, giving a definition of "World Music" is not easy. I guess an important element is that it is rooted in local tradition (although it can have modern elements and mix with other styles). It should make your mind float away to different places. And it definitely helps if it makes you groove a bit!

F Tobak said...

In the early 1980-s I first heard the words” World music” to what we did with Vasmalom to describe are music in England. We did Hungarian traditional music with a little twist how we described our self’s. Traditional (authentic) music on the solo instruments and singing, the "twist” was on the rhythm section. Most of the music we did doesn’t have traditionally bass or drum anyway, so we felt free, and we let free are fantasy and imagination on those instruments. All musicians was well established on his or her instruments, so the result was a something new, interesting and other people liked too. This day recording quality is part of the success if you want anybody play your music. Musicianship of course important and people mix together everything imaginable. Most of the time for no reason and there where I will draw the line.

LeRoc said...

Vasmalom seems interesting, I'll try to get a hold of some of your music.